Yuma International Airport, Yuma, Arizona (NYL)

Yuma International Airport, Yuma, Arizona (NYL) By Brian Schober Yuma is truly a unique place steeped in history and lore. Yuma is the source material for countless movies and novels about the Wild West. It also has a rich history that spans centuries and was crucial to America’s power. The area got a head start on history with Europeans,...


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Benson Municipal Airport (E95)

Benson Municipal Airport (E95) By Brian Schober Our next installment of highlighting Arizona airports takes us to Benson (E95). Benson Municipal Airport is about three miles northwest the city of Benson and about 30 miles east of Tucson in Arizona’s southern tier. Benson’s airport hasn’t always been at the current location. Records show that around 1930, Benson had an...


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Kingman Airport, Kingman Arizona

Kingman Airport, Kingman Arizona By Brian Schober The US Army Air Forces played a major role in developing many of Arizona’s current and long-gone airports. Kingman’s airport is no exception. The US Army Air Forces had a need to train gunnery crews assigned to the newly-developed B-17 Flying Fortresses and an unpopulated 4,000+ acres in Northwestern Arizona fit...


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Arizona Airport Focus — Cottonwood (P52)

Cottonwood (P52) By Brian Schober. This is the first in a series of articles highlighting unique and fun Arizona general aviation airports. This month, we are highlighting the Cottonwood airport, P52. The scenic and historic town of Cottonwood lies approximately 100 miles North of Phoenix or about 50 miles Southwest of Flagstaff. The airport was originally established in the...


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Hangar Haciendas Airpark (AZ90) Laveen, AZ

Hangar Haciendas Airpark (AZ90) Laveen, AZ by Kit McCloud. This airpark has to catch your eye if you’ve flown over it or driven by it. Nestled between South Mountain of Phoenix and a small ridge to the north, Hangar Haciendas Airpark is slightly out in the country you might say, but at the same time close to the metropolitan Phoenix...


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Castle Well Airpark

Castle Well Airpark (0AZ5) Morristown, AZ. Steve and Jackie Andros, originally from Cave Creek, searched out an area years ago near Morristown to build a runway and settle down. They purchased this 55 acre parcel now divided into smaller parcels for home sites. The micro area where the airpark sits is unique in that it contains beautiful views...


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Moreton Airpark

Moreton Airpark (23AZ) Wickenburg, AZ. Moreton is one of the oldest in the family of private Arizona airparks. Originating on the Moreton Ranch, at an elevation of elevation 2455’, the airfield was first surveyed and graded back in the fifties. In 1958 it was recognized by the federal government and designated by the FAA as 23AZ.


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Thunder Ridge Airpark

Thunder Ridge Airpark (AZ28) Morristown, AZ. Marristown, as described by Wikipedia, is a census-designated place in Maricopa County. The Thunder Ridge Airpark is located at the intersections of highway 60 and 74 on the way to Wickenburg. The airpark originated by four persons coming from another satellite airport in the Phoenix area back in 1993.


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header airparks-of-arizona eagle-roost

 

AIRPARK NAME / CONTACT 

CITY  HOMES / SITES  REALTOR 
Big Springs Airpark  Prescott  12    

   Mgr: Peter Hartman (928) 626-7207
 

        
Castle Wells   Morristown  5/10  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    Mgr: Gerald DaFoe  (810) 516-9122
 
      928-671-1597 
www.wickenburgpat.com

Eagle Roost Airpark   Aguila  85 / 115 (5 acre lots)  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
   Mgr: John Greissing  (928) 685-3433 
 
      928-671-1597
www.wickenburgpat.com

Flying Diamond Airpark   Tucson  20/97    
   Mgr: Lou Cook  (520) 399-3879 

        
Flying J Ranch   Pima  2/28   
   Mgr: Howard Jenkins  (928) 485-9201
 
        
Hangar Haciendas   Laveen  39 lots w/sep taxiways  Kevin Baker, Realtor®  Realty ONE Group

   Mgr:  Scott Johnson (602) 320-2382 

 

      480-432-9800
www.azaviationproperties.com

High Mesa Air Park   Safford  /19 (2.5 acre lots)    
   Mgr: Phil DiBartola 928-428-6811 

        
Inde Motorsports Ranch Airport  Wilcox  4/9 (1 acre lots) on    
   Mgr: John Mabry (520) 384-0796 

   100 acres w/racetrack
 
 
Indian Hills Airpark   Salome  75 Pat Mindrup - WEST USA Realty 
   Mgr: Gerry Breeyear (928) 916-0608 

      928-671-1597 
www.wickenburgpat.com
LaCholla Airpark  Oro Valley  122   
   Mgr: Larry Newman (520) 297-8096 

        
Mogollon Airpark Overgaard  60   
  Mgr: Brian
  http://www.mogollonairpark.com 

        
Montezuma Heights Airpark   Camp Verde  43/44    
   Mgr: Glen Tenniswood (928) 274-1233
 
        
Moreton Airpark   Wickenburg  2 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
   Mgr: Daniel Kropp (602) 315-0323 


      928-671-1597 
www.wickenburgpat.com

Pegasus Airpark   Empire  15/40  Erik McCormick - Choice One Properties 480-888-6380 

   Mgr: Jack @ 1st Svc
   Res (480) 987-9348 

      This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Pilot's Rest Airpark  Paulden  4/25   
   Resident: Dave Mansker 818-237-0008 

        
Ruby Star Airpark   Green Valley  13 / 74    
   Mgr: Wendy Magras (520) 477-1534 

        
Skyranch at Carefree   Carefree  20 Erik McCormick - Choice One Properties 480-888-6380 
   Mgr: Tommy Thomason (480) 488-3571 

      This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Stellar Air Park   Chandler  95/105  Erik McCormick - Choice One Properties 480-888-6380 
   Mgr: SRUA, Inc. (480) 295-2683 

      This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Sun Valley Airpark   Fort Mohave  55/107    
   Mgr: Jim Lambert (928) 768-5096 

        
Thunder Ridge Airpark  Morristown  9/14 (on 160 acres)  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
   Mgr:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

      928-671-1597 
www.wickenburgpat.com

Triangle Airpark  White Hills  115 acres    
   Mgr: Walt Stout (702) 202-9851  

        
Twin Hawks   Marana  2/40 (4 acre lots)    
   Mgr: Tim Blowers (520) 349-7677 

   on 155 acres 

  
Valley of the Eagle   Aguila  30 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
   Mgr: Jerry Witsken (928) 685-4859 

 

      928-671-1597 
www.wickenburgpat.com

 

Western Sky  Salome  all 200 acres for sale  Pat Mindrup - WEST USA Realty   
   Mgr: Mr. Hauer (877) 285-0662 

      928-671-1597 
www.wickenburgpat.com
Whetstone Airpark   Whetstone  5/12   
   Mgr: Brian Ulmer (520) 456-0483 

        

2015-pat-mindrup-realtor-ad-165px                          2018 erik-mccormick-choice-one-properties-165px  

 

Yuma International Airport, Yuma, Arizona (NYL)

Yuma International Airport, Yuma, Arizona (NYL) 

By Brian Schober 

 

Yuma is truly a unique place steeped in history and lore. Yuma is the source material for countless movies and novels about the Wild West. It also has a rich history that spans centuries and was crucial to America’s power. The area got a head start on history with Europeans, with the first of them arriving in what became the city in 1540, about 80 years before the Pilgrims reached Plymouth Rock. These early Spanish explorers had discovered a safe place to cross the raging Colorado River at what is now Yuma Crossing. Father Kino graced the area in his attempt to convert the locals to Christianity. Eventually, the US Army set up camp at Fort Yuma to protect American settlers traveling through Yuma hoping to strike it rich in the hills of San Francisco.

The proximity of Yuma to navigable waterways led the US Army to establish what became known as the 20-mule train. This amazing use of animals and wagons allowed supplies to reach even the most remote forts and encampments in the newly-acquired southwestern territories. The Transcontinental Railroad brought additional focus to Yuma as it passes right through the heart of the city. Yuma also housed the territorial prison whose rough and tumble reputation was feared amongst the criminals. Yuma had rightly earned a reputation for a rugged and tough Western town and the lore surrounding this history remains today.

In addition to this magnificent and wide-ranging host of historical events that took place in Yuma, the aviation scene in Yuma also predates all other Arizona cities. In 1911, Yuma became the site of the first aircraft to land in Arizona. In 1928, Fly Field (now Marine Corps Air Station Yuma) became one of the first airports in Arizona. That same year, Fly Field hosted 25 aircraft competing in a cross-country air race. In 1929, famed aviatrix Amelia Earhart ran her aircraft off the end of the runway in Yuma in the first women’s air race.

In 1941, the Civil Aeronautics Administration (CAA) established permanent runways at Fly Field and it became Yuma Army Air Base. Students trained in AT-6’s, T-17’s, and B-17’s in what had become one of the busiest flight schools in the nation. At the close of the war, flights ceased at the Army base and the post-war depression began to settle in. Not to rest on its laurels, locals banded together and set another aviation record with an Aeronca Sedan named “The City of Yuma.” This aircraft took off on August 24th, 1949, and touched down 47 days later on October 10th. Daredevil drivers sped down the runway and resupplied the pilots with fuel and food as the Aeronca flew low over the convertible. The air base was activated again in 1951, this time as part of the US Air Force. Eight years later, it was signed over to the US Navy and has been operated as the Marine Corps Air Station Yuma (MCAS Yuma) ever since.

MCAS is currently home to the US Marines Air Traffic Control training course, as well as a squadron of V-22 Ospreys, F-35 Joint Strike Fighters, AV-8 Harriers, UH-1, AH-1, and CH-53E rotorcraft. Just sitting in the terminal watching these aircraft can consume a whole day. These aircraft are all based on the East side of the runways.

Just North of Yuma on US Highway 95 sits the Yuma Proving Ground and Laguna Army Airfield. This is the site of the Military Free Fall School and a small fleet of C-17s, C-130s, the C-23, and drones, as well as UH-1s and UH-60s. Though the Laguna AAF Class D airspace falls under several Restricted Areas, the flights can be observed from the highway. The YPG flights support missions such as payload delivery system tests, NASA drop tests, High Altitude – Low Opening (HALO) jumps, and test target tracking missions against state of the art sensors. This is truly a military plane spotter’s dream location.

Interested yet? Fortunately, the MCAS Yuma runways double as Yuma International Airport (NYL) – a dual-use airport supporting military and civil aviation. It is important to note that there are multiple Restricted Areas surrounding Yuma due to the amount of military activity. Though the Restricted Areas occupy much of the airspace around Yuma and YPG, there is a flight corridor between R-2301W to the South and R-2311 and R2307 to the North that allows an approach from the East.

Yuma International is in Class D airspace and operates on both UHF and VHF frequencies. It is important to closely follow controller direction as they are also simultaneously controlling sometimes dozens of military aircraft via UHF. See and avoid becomes critical as you enter the busy airspace over the Fortuna Foothills to the East of town. There are four runways at NYL, including a pair of parallel runways. Pay close attention to runway assignments and ensure clearance to land has been received. Runway 3L/21R is a whopping 13,300’ x 200’! This should be enough room for everybody.

Once on the ground, request your taxi to Million Air, the local FBO. They are located on the West side of the airport. Million Air is a full-service FBO offering a plethora of pilot amenities including fuel, pilot lounge, showers, courtesy car, coffee, etc… and are open 6am to 11pm every day of the week. At the time of this writing, 100LL and Jet A self-serve both were selling for $4.31. The Jet A Way Café located in the Million Air facility offers café style food at reasonable prices, though call ahead if planning a weekend meal as they may not be open.

There is a small, non-towered airstrip in Rolle (44A) that is used primarily for training and some military contractor work. There are no services at Rolle and you must overfly NYL Class D airspace to get there. Unless prior transportation has been arranged, we recommend landing at NYL. Getting into town is simple. Uber and Lyft operate in Yuma, as well as multiple taxi services. Million Air offers a courtesy car, but it is first come, first served. With so much to see in Yuma, it’s also best to come with a plan of attack. The downtown area is home to the Territorial Prison, Arizona’s most visited State Historic Site. Also downtown are monuments to the Transcontinental Railroad. The vibrant “old town” district retains the rustic look and feel of several decades ago, yet plays host to many boutiques, restaurants and shops.

If adventure is in the cards, ATV and side-by-side rentals are available to roam the spectacular Imperial Dunes just over the border in California. Paddle board, kayak, and canoe rentals are available in town for river tours, as well. Martinez Lake is just North of town near YPG and boat rentals are offered there for a day on the lake.

There are multiple farm stands open most of the year offering locally grown produce. Crops are grown year-round and the active agricultural impact is evident throughout town. If an overnight stay is required, be prepared for the onslaught of night crop dusting by fixed and rotary wing aircraft. This is a spectacular sight to watch as the aircraft dodge tall palm trees and power lines at night!

YPG offers an artillery museum at the Visitor Control Center just off base. On base, a Yuma Test Center museum houses more artifacts and details the wide-ranging history of the facility. Included in the static displays is a Cessna O-2A Skymaster in Army livery. This O-2A was one of the last two O-2s in active service in the United States.

Head on out to the southwest corner of Arizona and take in all that Yuma has to offer. With a history rich in Old West lore and deep-rooted aviation history, Yuma is a perfect getaway and shouldn’t be missed. We hope to see you there!

Benson Municipal Airport (E95)

Benson Municipal Airport (E95) 

By Brian Schober 

 

Our next installment of highlighting Arizona airports takes us to Benson (E95). Benson Municipal Airport is about three miles northwest the city of Benson and about 30 miles east of Tucson in Arizona’s southern tier. Benson’s airport hasn’t always been at the current location. Records show that around 1930, Benson had an airport built just east of town known as Benson Intermediate Field. Though it is now a private field, it is currently registered as 31AZ. This airport was built as an emergency airfield by the Bureau of Air Commerce and encountered intermittent closures and openings throughout its history. In 1999, Benson opened a new public-use airport and this field is currently in use today.

Benson has achieved some fame through the ages, with many feature films being filmed nearby. Tombstone, The Quick and the Dead, The Outlaw Josey Wales, and Tom Horn are a few off the top. Benson’s unique location and character is perfect for the quintessential Old West feel many are looking for when selecting a film location.
There is a ton to do and see near Benson. For example, Kartchner Caverns State Park is just a couple of miles outside of town and is a must-see feature. Access to the park is a nominal per-vehicle fee of $7. Tours of the park, including headlamps and helmets, are $30 and purchase of the tour waives the entry fee. The Caverns are a remarkable and unique cave experience that truly must be seen.

If a more authentic Western adventure better suits your style, the Double R Ranch may fit the bill. Offering guided rides from beginner to advanced and ranging from $45-200 for 1-hour to full-day rides, there is a package for every budget and experience level. Double R is about 16 miles north of the airport; however, a taxi or Uber will get you there in short order.

For movie buffs, the Gammons Gulch movie set may fit the bill. This Old West movie town is open for walking or guided tours. This is an active movie set and there may be filming taking place at any time. This is a truly unique adventure that allows a “behind the scenes” look at some amazing history. Call ahead for guided tour reservations ($8.00pp cash only), as the owners may be assisting film crews.

About 22 miles east headed down I-10, Bowlin’s “The Thing” awaits the unsuspecting. You may have seen (and avoided) the billboards stretching from Tucson all the way to El Paso taunting you to visit. After all, it’s hard to ignore 247 billboards along this route. If time permits, a short drive down I-10 may satisfy that urge to visit. After all, it’s only a buck and there’s a great museum, to boot.

Interested yet? Now let’s talk about the airport. There’s a single 4002’ x 75’ asphalt runway in excellent condition. The East/West runway is sufficient for most wind conditions, though the FAA reports erratic wind currents approximately ½ mile from the threshold when winds exceed 10 knots, so use caution. E95 is a VFR-only airport, but is lighted for nighttime operations. Prior to arrival, check Benson’s AWOS on 118.475 and then call up on CTAF at 122.8 to announce intentions. Keep in mind that the Saguaro National Park and the Rincon Wilderness Areas lie just northwest of the airport and pilots are requested to remain above 2000’ AGL in these areas. This can be as high as 10,500’ MSL due to the terrain in this region, so plan your route accordingly to help avoid these protected areas.

Once on the ground, Southwestern Aviation operates the FBO and offers 100LL and Jet A. There is a courtesy car available, though it’s a bit older than most. The 1955 Dodge Coronet and makes for an unforgettable adventure all on its own. APA members receive a $0.10/gal discount on AVGAS, and another $0.05/gal discount if paying by cash. Additionally, Southwestern hosts “Can’t Pass Gas Saturdays” on the third Saturday of every month and beats the lowest price within 50 miles by $0.20/gal and hosts a great fly-in breakfast. If the loaner is out in use, there are several taxi operations, as well as Uber and Lyft that can take you anywhere you need to go.

While Benson may be out of the way, there is a lot to do and see in the area. Benson Municipal is a modern airport that services this unique pocket of Old West Charm. The FBO is pro-General Aviation and would love to see you come out and visit. Stop in and say “Hi!” to Roy.

Kingman Airport, Kingman Arizona

Kingman Airport, Kingman Arizona 

By Brian Schober 

 

 

The US Army Air Forces played a major role in developing many of Arizona’s current and long-gone airports. Kingman’s airport is no exception. The US Army Air Forces had a need to train gunnery crews assigned to the newly-developed B-17 Flying Fortresses and an unpopulated 4,000+ acres in Northwestern Arizona fit the bill perfectly. The government moved and began construction in early 1942. The gunnery ranges opened later in 1942 with multiple airstrips and emergency landing fields built to support them. The airfield was renamed Kingman Army Air Field on May 7, 1943. In all, over 36,000 gunners were trained at Kingman Army Air Field through 1945.

Following the end of World War II, Kingman shifted from gunnery training to aircraft reclamation and storage. Known as Storage Depot 41, aircraft were flown to Kingman for dismantling and recycling. Rather than storing the planes, as the name would suggest, over 5500 aircraft were dismantled and melted down for scrap over the next three years. Sadly, most of these aircraft were B-17s. Once the recycling effort was completed, the land was turned over to the county.

Though the war and the related warplane “storage” efforts are long over and nearly forgotten, the airport continues to thrive. Coincidentally, storage is precisely what drives commerce at the airport today. Airliners, commuters, and corporate aircraft are mothballed and stored at Kingman. Dozens of aircraft sit waiting to become donors to other flying aircraft or to be resurrected in new livery at another airline. The on-site repair station manages the storage and maintenance of these aircraft. In addition to aircraft services, an 1,100-acre industrial park helps support the airport and hosts over 70 businesses. This industrial park is second largest in Arizona, led only by Maricopa County. Close access to Interstate freeways and rail lines, the location is perfect for fast distribution of goods.

Kingman Airport (KIGM) is located approximately 8 miles northeast of the city center. Though untowered, with a pair of long runways capable of 737-class aircraft, there is plenty of room for nearly any aircraft. Runway 3/21 is 6,827’ x 150’ and Runway 17/35 is 6,725’ x 75’, with Runway 21 being the preferred calm-wind runway. Field elevation is a modest 3449’msl. Air’Zona Aircraft Services operates the FBO on the field. There are minimal $5/single and $10/twin tie-down fees if needing to stay the night. At the time of this writing, Avgas is priced at $5.51 for self-serve and $5.76 for full-serve. Jet A is priced at $3.83 and $4.08, respectively.

The Kingman Airport Café offers traditional breakfast and lunch fare in an aviation-themed restaurant. Open from 7am – 2pm, breakfast is served until closing time at 2pm, so a delayed start to the morning flight will not result in missed pancakes. Indoor booths and tables are available, as well as patio dining during the summer. The Café even has t-shirts, caps, and mugs available for purchase.

Once in Kingman and breakfast is finished, take time to enjoy the remarkable history this airport has to offer. The original control tower remains an icon, as the multiple flights of stairs leading to the windowed room are visible. The Kingman Army Airfield Historical Society has created a museum to document, highlight and preserve the importance this field played in our nation’s history. The museum is housed in an original hangar built in 1942.

The airport is located just off of historic Route 66. Uber or Lyft provide transportation, as do several taxi companies. This airport is not Kingman’s only brush with aviation history. Prior to the military field opening, Charles Lindbergh created an airstrip out of what had been a cow pasture as part of the first trans-continental airmail route. The strip was updated by Transcontinental Air Transport, the predecessor to TWA, and became Wallapai (Hualapai) Field. This airfield has since been built over; however, Kingman is rich in history and the multiple parks and memorials in town stand as a testament to this desert outpost.

Kingman is approximately 130nm Northwest of Phoenix, 240nm Northwest of Tucson, and 100nm West of Flagstaff. Nestled in a valley, the backdrop of the Hualapai range just to the South, the Cerrat Mountains to the West, and the Cottonwood Cliffs to the East all make for a scenic approach. These features also lead to downdrafts and wind conditions unique to flying in mountains, so focusing on weather conditions is highly recommended. The Bagdad 1 and Gladden 1 MOAs lie just to the South of Kingman, so use caution when navigating near or through them. We hope to see you there soon!

Arizona Airport Focus — Cottonwood (P52)

Cottonwood (P52) By Brian Schober.  This is the first in a series of articles highlighting unique and fun Arizona general aviation airports. This month, we are highlighting the Cottonwood airport, P52. The scenic and historic town of Cottonwood lies approximately 100 miles North of Phoenix or about 50 miles Southwest of Flagstaff. The airport was originally established in the early 1940’s as a training base for World War II naval cadets. The airport has been owned and operated by the Town/City of Cottonwood since 1968.

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Hangar Haciendas Airpark (AZ90) Laveen, AZ

Hangar Haciendas Airpark (AZ90) Laveen, AZ by Kit McCloud. This airpark has to catch your eye if you’ve flown over it or driven by it. Nestled between South Mountain of Phoenix and a small ridge to the north, Hangar Haciendas Airpark is slightly out in the country you might say, but at the same time close to the metropolitan Phoenix area. As you can see in the photo on their website, there were only a couple of houses on the airpark in 1984. This park has developed rapidly compared to most airparks in Arizona. The residents have over 25 planes based here including a helicopter.

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Castle Well Airpark

Castle Well Airpark (0AZ5) Morristown, AZ. Steve and Jackie Andros, originally from Cave Creek, searched out an area years ago near Morristown to build a runway and settle down.  They purchased this 55 acre parcel now divided into smaller parcels for home sites.  The micro area where the airpark sits is unique in that it contains beautiful views with an abundance of saguaros, several hiking and riding trails nearby, is surrounded by public lands, and is nearby highways 60 and 74 for quick access to Phoenix by car.

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Moreton Airpark

Moreton Airpark (23AZ) Wickenburg, AZ. Moreton is one of the oldest in the family of private Arizona airparks. Originating on the Moreton Ranch, at an elevation of elevation 2455’, the airfield was first surveyed and graded back in the fifties. In 1958 it was recognized by the federal government and designated by the FAA as 23AZ.

Read more...

Thunder Ridge Airpark

Thunder Ridge Airpark (AZ28) Morristown, AZ. Marristown, as described by Wikipedia, is a census-designated place in Maricopa County.  The Thunder Ridge Airpark is located at the intersections of highway 60 and 74 on the way to Wickenburg.  The airpark originated by four persons coming from another satellite airport in the Phoenix area back in 1993.

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Indian Hills Airpark

Indian Hills Airpark (2AZ1) Salome, AZ. Many of the Arizona airparks have uniqueness about them and Indian Hills is no exception. Located 100 miles west of Phoenix Sky Harbor on Highway 60 midway between I-10/60 junction and Aguila (Eagle Roost airpark), this airpark is home to 70 residents on 93 home sites. I had the pleasure of speaking with Jerry Breeyear about the airpark; he is the Airport Facilities Manager. Jerry is amongst several volunteers at Indian Hills who have a love for aviation and want to keep overhead to a minimum. 

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Skyranch at Carefree

Skyranch (18AZ) Carefree, AZ. “Caution: Aviation may be hazardous to your wealth…” As promised, I wanted to showcase some of Arizona’s many airparks. Where better to start than the very first Arizona airport to offer residents fly-in access? Carefree’s Skyranch. At an elevation of 2568 feet, the 27 acre airpark is in a magnificent location northeast of Phoenix, near Black Mountain, where the nearby granite rock formations of the Boulders Resort only enhance the already spectacular Sonoran desert. Built in 1961 as part of a master-planned community by visionary developers K.T. Palmer and Tom Darlington, the airpark predates the 1984 incorporation of the Town of Carefree by nearly 25 years.

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